Consider This Se ora

A group of American expatriates settles in a quiet Mexican town, where they enjoy spacious adobe houses and the tolerance of the natives. By the author of Stones for Ibarra. 50,000 first printing. $50,000 ad/promo.

Consider This  Se  ora

A group of American expatriates settles in a quiet Mexican town, where they enjoy spacious adobe houses and the tolerance of the natives. By the author of Stones for Ibarra. 50,000 first printing. $50,000 ad/promo.

More Books:

Consider This, Señora
Language: en
Pages: 241
Authors: Harriet Doerr
Categories: Fiction
Type: BOOK - Published: 1993 - Publisher: Harcourt

A group of American expatriates settles in a quiet Mexican town, where they enjoy spacious adobe houses and the tolerance of the natives. By the author of Stones for Ibarra. 50,000 first printing. $50,000 ad/promo.
Consider this, senora
Language: ja
Pages: 286
Authors: Harriet Doerr
Categories: Fiction
Type: BOOK - Published: 1997 - Publisher:

Books about Consider this, senora
Consider This, Senora/\Harriet Doerr
Language: en
Pages: 241
Authors: Harriet Doerr
Categories: Fiction
Type: BOOK - Published: 1994 - Publisher:

Books about Consider This, Senora/\Harriet Doerr
Consider This, Señora
Language: en
Pages: 241
Authors: Harriet Doerr
Categories: Americans
Type: BOOK - Published: 1994 - Publisher:

"In this highly praised second novel by the author of Stones of Ibarra the characters find themselves waiting, hoping, and living in rural Mexico--a land with the power to enchant, repel, and change all who pass through. Each of the North Americans who settles in Amapolas interacts with the landscape
The Aztec Palimpsest
Language: en
Pages: 224
Authors: Daniel Cooper Alarc—n
Categories: Science
Type: BOOK - Published: 1997-03 - Publisher: University of Arizona Press

Mexico is more than a country; it is a concept that is the product of a complex network of discourses as disparate as the rhetoric of Chicano nationalism, English-language literature about Mexico, and Mexican tourist propaganda. The idea of "Mexicanness," says Daniel Cooper Alarc—n, "has arisen through a process of