Consuming Russia

From rock and sport to film and popular literature, here is a cook’s tour of the sad, curious, and sometimes marvelous carnival of post-Soviet public expression.”-Jeffrey Brooks, Johns Hopkins University

Consuming Russia

A timely study of the “new Russia” at the end of the twentieth century.

More Books:

Consuming Russia
Language: en
Pages: 473
Authors: Adele Marie Barker
Categories: History
Type: BOOK - Published: 1999 - Publisher: Duke University Press

A timely study of the “new Russia” at the end of the twentieth century.
Pop Culture Russia!
Language: en
Pages: 399
Authors: Birgit Beumers
Categories: Reference
Type: BOOK - Published: 2005-01-01 - Publisher: ABC-CLIO

A revealing look at contemporary Russian popular culture, exploring the historical and social influences that make it unique.
Fragmented Identities
Language: en
Pages: 187
Authors: Denise Roman
Categories: History
Type: BOOK - Published: 2007 - Publisher: Lexington Books

Observing postcommunist Romania with the dual vision of a native and a scholar, Denise Roman focuses on the fluid act of identity-formation, and the construction or absence of identity-politics, in several minority or disempowered groups: youth, Jews, women, and queers. Roman shows how both aesthetic and moral judgments are born
Gender and Consumption
Language: en
Pages: 256
Authors: Lydia Martens, Emma Casey
Categories: Social Science
Type: BOOK - Published: 2016-04-15 - Publisher: Routledge

Drawing upon anthropological, sociological and historical perspectives, this volume provides a unique insight into women’s domestic consumption. The contributors argue that domestic consumption represents an important lens through which to examine the everyday production and reproduction of socio-economic relations. Through a variety of case studies (such as gambling, wedding day
Not by Bread Alone
Language: en
Pages: 257
Authors: Melissa L. Caldwell
Categories: Social Science
Type: BOOK - Published: 2004-03-16 - Publisher: Univ of California Press

What Muscovites get in a soup kitchen run by the Christian Church of Moscow is something far more subtle and complex—if no less necessary and nourishing—than the food that feeds their hunger. In Not by Bread Alone, the first full-length ethnographic study of poverty and social welfare in the postsocialist