Lyric Orientations

The “reconvening” I show taking place in lyric orientations is not always directly or visibly social or communal, but understanding the view of language in which language and the world are learned together means that changing a reader's ...

Lyric Orientations

In Lyric Orientations, Hannah Vandegrift Eldridge explores the power of lyric poetry to stir the social and emotional lives of human beings in the face of the ineffable nature of our mortality. She focuses on two German-speaking masters of lyric prose and poetry: Friedrich Hölderlin (1770–1843) and Rainer Maria Rilke (1875–1926). While Hölderlin and Rilke are stylistically very different, each believes in the power of poetic language to orient us as social beings in contexts that otherwise can be alienating. They likewise share the conviction that such alienation cannot be overcome once and for all in any universal event. Both argue that to deny the uncertainty created by the absence of any such event (or to deny the alienation itself) is likewise to deny the particularly human condition of uncertainty and mortality. By drawing on the work of Stanley Cavell, who explores how language in all its formal aspects actually enables us to engage meaningfully with the world, Eldridge challenges poststructuralist scholarship, which stresses the limitations—even the failure—of language in the face of reality. Eldridge provides detailed readings of Hölderlin and Rilke and positions them in a broader narrative of modernity that helps make sense of their difficult and occasionally contradictory self-characterizations. Her account of the orienting and engaging capabilities of language reconciles the extraordinarily ambitious claims that Hölderlin and Rilke make for poetry—that it can create political communities, that it can change how humans relate to death, and that it can unite the sensual and intellectual components of human subjectivity—and the often difficult, fragmented, or hermetic nature of their individual poems.

More Books:

Lyric Orientations
Language: en
Pages: 232
Authors: Hannah Vandegrift Eldridge
Categories: Literary Criticism
Type: BOOK - Published: 2016-11-08 - Publisher: Cornell University Press

In Lyric Orientations, Hannah Vandegrift Eldridge explores the power of lyric poetry to stir the social and emotional lives of human beings in the face of the ineffable nature of our mortality. She focuses on two German-speaking masters of lyric prose and poetry: Friedrich Hölderlin (1770–1843) and Rainer Maria Rilke
The Poem Electric
Language: en
Pages: 296
Authors: Seth Perlow
Categories: Literary Criticism
Type: BOOK - Published: 2018-12-18 - Publisher: U of Minnesota Press

An enlightening examination of the relationship between poetry and the information technologies increasingly used to read and write it Many poets and their readers believe poetry helps us escape straightforward, logical ways of thinking. But what happens when poems confront the extraordinarily rational information technologies that are everywhere in the
Goethe Yearbook 25
Language: en
Pages: 338
Authors: Adrian Daub, Elisabeth Krimmer
Categories: Literary Criticism
Type: BOOK - Published: 2018-06-15 - Publisher: Boydell & Brewer

Cutting-edge scholarly articles on diverse aspects of Goethe and the Goethezeit, featuring in this volume a special section on acoustics around 1800.
Holderlin's Philosophy of Nature
Language: en
Pages: 272
Authors: Rochelle Tobias
Categories: Literary Criticism
Type: BOOK - Published: 2020-05-28 - Publisher: Edinburgh University Press

This collection of 15 essays by distinguished international scholars reconsiders what Friedrich Hölderlin's work reveals about the impulses toward form and formlessness in nature and the role that poetry plays in creating Holderlin's 'harmonious opposition'.
Beyond Autonomy in Eighteenth-Century British and German Aesthetics
Language: en
Pages: 302
Authors: Karl Axelsson, Camilla Flodin, Mattias Pirholt
Categories: Philosophy
Type: BOOK - Published: 2020-10-26 - Publisher: Routledge

This volume re-examines traditional interpretations of the rise of modern aesthetics in eighteenth-century Britain and Germany. It provides a new account that connects aesthetic experience with morality, science, and political society. In doing so, it challenges long-standing teleological narratives that emphasize disinterestedness and the separation of aesthetics from moral, cognitive,